Your 5 Steps To Study In US In UNDERGRADUATE

Posted on Posted in US EDUCATION

STEP 1:

RESEARCH YOUR OPTIONS

Studying in the United States is a memorable and rewarding experience – congratulations on taking this exciting step towards your future!

In planning your move to the United States, you may want to ask for assistance from an EducationUSA Advising Center in your home country and from the international student adviser at your chosen community college. The more that you prepare for your study experience, the more you will enjoy it.

Make Travel Arrangements
Before making travel arrangements, confirm with your community college when you are expected to arrive on campus to comply with visa regulations. It is also important to finalize health insurance, communication plans with family and friends, emergency plans and other travel related items. Remember that you are not allowed to enter the United Stated more than 30 days prior to the start of your I-20 or DS-2019.

Attend a Pre-departure Orientation in Your Country
EducationUSA Advising Centers around the world organize pre-departure orientations for students making final preparations to depart for their studies in the United States.

EducationUSA advisers and students who have returned from the United States provide information and resources that will help prepare you for new experiences and skills to adjust to new challenges. Topics discussed include cultural differences, motivation, changes from your home environment, academic systems and expectations, housing, and handy tips for settling into your new home.

Gather Pre-departure Materials & Important Documents for Arrival
Everyone arriving in the United States passes through an inspection by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers. Learn more about this arrival process and the documents required for entry.

Reporting to Your School & Attending Orientations 
U.S. community colleges typically offer a special orientation for international students in addition to a regular student orientation. New students should plan on attending both as they cover different information. At these orientations you will meet your Designated School Official (DSO) to check in, complete your required visa information session, and learn additional information about the institution’s international student policies and procedures. Attending these orientations is crucial for all new international students on campus.

years of full-time study. U.S. colleges and universities have student advisers who guide students in their choice of courses to reach the credit hours needed for graduation.

More information:

STEP 2:

Finance Your Studies

Start your undergraduate financial planning as early as possible to assess what you can afford. As you work to develop a budget for your studies, keep in mind that your overall costs include tuition, fees, and living expenses. Actual costs vary by institution, so refer to each institution’s website for specific costs. When budgeting, you should estimate that tuition costs typically increase 6-10% each year.

Assess Personal Funds

Start out by evaluating how much funding you and your family are able to provide for your education. If you are planning to apply for financial aid, note that general financial aid amounts are based on the difference between college costs and what your family can afford. If you compete in sports, look into athletic scholarships. Understand that most scholarship awards may cover only part of the total educational and living costs and may not be available to first-year international students.

How can you reduce your educational costs?

  • Research a wide variety of public and private schools
  • Think about applying to colleges in areas of the United States that have a lower cost of living, such as in the South or the Midwest or in more rural areas of the country
  • Attend a community college first, then transfer to a four-year school to complete your bachelor’s degree

How can EducationUSA Advisers help you plan your expenses?

Advisers can help you distinguish yourself in a highly competitive applicant pool so that you have a better chance of competing for admission with financial aid. Advisers have access to resources that help you learn about scholarships and new programs. Advisers also share current information about financial aid opportunities.

General Funding Resources:

STEP 3:

Complete Your Application

Start early, plan ahead, and know the application requirements. Application packages require a great deal of preparation and planning.

You will benefit by starting this process early. You should plan adequately for the time and effort involved. Make a calendar of deadlines to track what you need to do and when it needs to be completed.

In the United States, application requirements can vary greatly from one institution to another. Check the specific requirements on the website of each institution’s international admissions office. It is typical for U.S. undergraduate applications to be due between November and January for students who wish to begin courses the following September.

Some general application requirements:

  • Educational credentials: This is typically your secondary/high school diploma and transcripts, as well as any final national exams required in your country. Transcripts are certified copies of your educational record, courses, and grades. An original transcript or certified copy sent by your secondary/high school is generally required for each institution you apply to for admission, along with translations into English.
  • Standardized test scores: Scores may be required to assess your academic ability and English proficiency level.
  • Recommendation letters: The head or principal of your school, your school counselor, your personal tutor, teachers, coaches, or supervisors from professional experiences may write recommendation letters. Your recommenders must be able to write about your work and be able to assess your potential to do well pursuing a higher education degree. Be sure to choose someone who knows you well.
  • Essay/personal statement: This is your chance to write about your interests, long-term goals, and strengths – one of the most important aspects of your application.

For further guidance, visit one of the EducationUSA advising centers.

STEP 4:

Apply For Your Student Visa

You’ve now reached Step 4! Applying for your U.S. student visa. This next step will cover F, J and M student visa types.

Information pertaining to visas and travel can be found on the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs website and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Study in the States.

Choose your level of study to learn more about applying for your student visa.

STEP 5:

Prepare For Your Departure

Studying in the United States is a memorable and rewarding experience.  Congratulations on taking this exciting step towards your future!

In planning your move to the United States, you may want to ask for assistance from an EducationUSA advising center in your home country and from the international student adviser at your chosen college or university. The more that you prepare for your study experience, the more you will enjoy it.

Make Travel Arrangements
Before making travel arrangements, confirm with your institution when you are expected to arrive on campus to comply with visa regulations. Finalize your health insurance, communication plans with family and friends, emergency plans, and other travel-related items. Remember that you may not enter the United States more than 30 days prior to the start of your I-20 or DS-2019.

Attend a Pre-departure Orientation in Your Country
EducationUSA advising centers organize pre-departure orientations for students as part of final preparations to depart for the United States. EducationUSA advisers and students who have returned from their U.S. studies provide information and resources that will prepare you for new experiences as you focus on strategies to adjust to new challenges. Topics discussed include cultural differences, motivation, changes from your home environment, academic systems and expectations, housing, and handy tips for settling into your new community.

Gather Necessary Documents for Arrival
Everyone arriving in the United States passes through an inspection by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). Learn more about arrival and the documents required for entry.

Report to Your School and Join On-Campus Orientations
U.S. institutions offer a special orientation for international students, in addition to a regular student orientation. New students should attend both as they cover different information. At these orientations, you will meet your Designated School Official (DSO) to check in, complete your required visa information session, and learn more about the institution’s international student policies and procedures. Attending these orientations is crucial for all new international students on campus.

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